Classes

Hands on Training

IMPORTANT NOTICE

All hands-on-training classes have specific REQUIREMENTS. All potential students should review the requirements for their chosen class below. If you do not have access to the appropriate equipment, please contact us ahead of time by calling 316-268-4485 during regular business hours or emailing cshirley@wichita.gov and we will see what we can do to assist you. We will not be able to accommodate those who arrive unprepared the day of the event and those without the appropriate equipment cannot participate for safety reasons.

At minimum, all hands-on students MUST have completed and brought with them the following: Live Release Form. This form will need to be signed by both an appropriate officer from your organization and yourself. You will be asked to turn it in when checking in on Saturday.

 

Engine Company Operations

Keith Niemann, Jonathan Hall, Members of WFD Engine Company 10/B

SOLD OUT

The fire service begins and ends with engine company fundamentals. This class will offer various methods of handling the deployment and application of hoselines at fire scenes as well as provide valuable insights from experienced engine company officers. You will be taught various techniques for both 1 3/4" and 2 1/2" attack lines, drawing on the teachings and experience of many different fire service instructors. Students will be shown ways for overcoming understaffed engines, common pitfalls and tips for excellent teamwork on the fire ground. The live fire portion of this class also allows students to interface with those performing other operations.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Regional Training Center - 4780 E 31st South, Wichita - Zone TBA

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Firefighter Survival - Down & Dirty

James Payne, Trevor Steedman, Robert Mitchell

Available

Learn from instructors that have been involved in actual firefighter removals and have assisted to establish successful R.I.T. programs. Techniques performed will assist in expediting the removal of a downed firefighter. The course covers various drags, carries, high point rescue maneuvers, and airway management procedures to assist the downed firefighter. Members will be tasked with performing many firefighter removals with the use of tools that are carried by the firefighter on the everyday fire. Students will also perform various entanglement drills to reinforce the skills needed to assist with the many dangerous hazards that may be encountered. Firefighters will also understand when to call the “mayday”. You will be challenged to think outside of the box.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Regional Training Center - 4780 E 31st South, Wichita - Zone TBA

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Tactical Extrication

Isaac Frazier

Available

This class provides a realistic “street” approach to training that’s been forged on the nation’s deadliest roadways. This program hits many important and high-probability scenarios including side-resting vehicles, side outs, various alternative dash displacements, steering wheel de-ringing, guardrail entrapments, various tips, and much more. When we understand the "whys" of each method, we can understand the "hows" when Plan A doesn't work. Regardless of your staffing or equipment, this program is for you. It has been proven that when lives hang in the balance, quick thinking can mean life or death.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • LKQ Waiver Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural or Rescue Rated Helmet
  • Structural or Extrication Gloves
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection

CLASS LOCATION: LKQ Pick Your Part - 700 E 21st St N, Wichita

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Realistic Fireground Forcible Entry

Cameron Meier, Dan Mishler

Available

Every assignment on the fire ground can only be performed after we obtain entry into the structure. As American’s have become more security conscious, the ability to perform proper forcible entry has become more critical than ever. Forcible entry can be one of the most challenging tasks to perform and even more challenging to train on. Knowing this bread and butter techniques will be reviewed, understood, and the why's explained. Time on the tool is paramount and a majority of the day will be spent in scenarios that can be immediately applied to the fire ground.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection
  • SCBA

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Department Station 2 - 1240 S Broadway St, Wichita

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Street Smart Rescue

Chad Winton

Available

The Technical Rescue world has made great strides over the years in regards to equipment and tactics used to mitigate emergencies involving high risk-low frequency call types. With all the advancements some could argue that we have become too “technical” in Technical Rescue. This hands-on class will take the participant through a fast paced series of “real world” scenarios that place an emphasis on “safely and quickly getting the job done” utilizing basic equipment and rescue tactics that have been around for years and have stood the test of time. This track focuses on skills that add more “tools to the tool box” for the rescuer who finds themselves in situations requiring quick action but with limited equipment and manpower. Topics to be covered include patient removal above/below grade; stabilization (vehicle/structural); using non-technical rescue personnel in the rescue operation; non-conventional use of conventional fire ground tools in the rescue world; simple rope systems; lifting and moving heavy objects; and much more.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Regional Training Center - 4780 E 31st South, Wichita - Zone TBA

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Vent, Enter, Search

Daniel Nelms

Available

In the fire service, we often say that life safety is our main priority. However, in 2016 alone, there were 2,294 deaths reported in residential fires. Now it’s time to “be about it”, not just say it. Vent-Enter-Search (VES) is a technique developed by the FDNY and now employed across the nation. VES operations have been credited for saving dozens of lives across the country every year. Whether you work on an Engine, Truck, or Rescue Co., VES needs to be a tool included in your “tool box”. In this class, we will discuss and implement tool selection for VES operations, single person ladder throws, performing saw work from ladders, entry techniques, room isolation, primary searches, victim removal from windows and down ladders, as well as the use of thermal imaging technology during VES operations. We hope to see you there, and remember, "Stay safe, stay low, and let it blow."

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Regional Training Center - 4780 E 31st South, Wichita - Zone TBA

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Truck Company Operations

Scott Kleinschmidt, Arthur Ashley, Brian Jetton, Seth Taylor, Chris Moren, Nick Sequenzia, Michael Heeney, Tim Vandermeer, Members of WFD Truck Company 1/C, 2/B, and 3/A

Available

This fast paced hands on course will take the participant through best practices in street level Truck Company Operations that focuses on the reality, not “theory”, when it comes to sound tactics in Forcible Entry, Roof Operations, Ground Ladders, and Search Operations. Tactics that fit into any department deployment model and within individual apparatus staffing levels. Within a low student to instructor ratio you will learn proven tips and tricks from guys that do it and not just teach it. If you are looking to challenge your skill set and take it to the next level this course is for you.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection

CLASS LOCATION: TBA - 4780 E 31st South, Wichita - TBA

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Lectures

Commander's Intent: Coordinated Actions for Mission Success

Sid Newby

Fireground Commander’s Intent: It’s time to beat the fire at its own game. To aggressively take over real estate and control the fuel it needs to survive and kill it with coordinated engine and truck work. To go into harm’s way to protect people and save property.

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Engine Companies' Guide to Winning

Steve Robertson

This program is designed for anyone from command staff to a line firefighter. The class will cover essential aspects of Engine Company Operations, such as size-up, job assignments, and managing the initial attack line. Additional topics to be discussed are overcoming difficult stretches, using the reach of your stream inside structures, and options for limited manpower situations. The class will cover drills which can be used to become proficient in engine company operations.

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The Engine Company Officer

Tim Klett

"From the Firehouse to the Fire floor”, this class covers the many keys decisions before, during and after any fire incident. These decisions can ultimately make or break the operation and put lives at risk. Knowing your firefighters strengths and weaknesses will make your decisions more effective and productive. The size, placement and operation of the first line have a direct impact on the success of the operation and all of these decisions fall on the shoulders of the first due Engine officer, making him a key player on the fireground.

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Extreme Ownership in the Fire Service 2.0

Jonathan Jarvis

Extreme ownership in the fire service is about taking responsibility for everything in your world, from the smallest thing like a clean station to getting a properly hooked-up water supply . With a positive attitude and a properly trained skill set there isn’t a task that you can’t accomplish on the fire ground. This is a class that will teach you how to be the most successful firefighter that you possibly can be. I’ve compiled a list of information from 20+ senior members of the WFD and other departments across the country on what they think a solid firefighter should know. This class will cover everything from why attention to detail is important, to proper eating and fitness and how to conduct search and rescue operations.

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Fireground Physics

Jeremiah Connell

This class will provide the "why" and "how" of the skills and techniques we use on the fireground. By having a basic understanding of the laws of physics we can be more efficient with our fireground functions. We will go over the basics of forces around us and how we apply them, body mechanics and the use of the tools of the trade.

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First-In Decisions for First-In Fire Officers

Chad Menard

When the tones drop and you’re the First-In FireFighter will you be ready? This class is dedicated to preparing firefighters of all ranks and all department sizes for the first few key moments on the fire ground. We don't care if you see seven fires a year, seventy fires a year, a unty fire department, or a city fire department; we want to give you to tools necessary to put the troops to work and get things done. This is a very interactive class with lots of student participation with scenarios that are based around scene size-ups, command, reading smoke, building construction, engine work, truck work, and shows the importance of situational awareness, a good 360, and a quick thorough search based off of real world incidents from the last 14 years. If you're wanting to hone your skills for the right front seat this class is for you!

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Hazards of Knee Walls

Jonathan Hall

According to 2014 National Fire Protection Association statistics, fires in one- and two-family homes accounted for 55.4 percent of all structure fires. Often, these fires occur in dwellings that contain occupied half-stories constructed with knee walls, which present tremendous challenges to responding firefighters and have resulted in numerous Maydays. Building construction containing knee walls can be found in most every community from urban to rural, in older legacy homes, as well as in modern pre-manufactured truss homes. Knee walls can conceal tremendous amounts of combustible gases that are waiting for the proper mixture to ignite. Members can easily be on the fire floor with no smoke and little to no heat conditions. As soon as members open up the knee walls, extreme fire conditions can erupt with little to no warning. Students will learn the severe hazards that knee walls present, how to recognize them early, and how to safely mitigate incidents involving them.

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Motivation in Training: Let's Get It Back

Scott Peterson

This class was developed and designed to help fire departments both large and small to help overcome the lack of motivation in their training. So many times regardless if we are a paid firefighter or a volunteer firefighter we find any “excuse” not to attend training. This class identifies why we do not train, and how we can look at some options to get motivated to attend training, be productive at training, and help our fellow brothers and sisters to become motivated to train. It also looks at the reason why we need to train and the results if we don’t. This is an interactive class getting to know the students and the issues in their own departments. We will use class participation, video, and even use our emotions as a motivator. Someone once asked me do I have a quote to live by as an instructor, I gave it some thought and a few weeks later I had one..."Let no mountain change the outcome of a person's success."

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Removing the Technical From 'Tech Rescue'

Scott Kleinschmidt, Chad Winton

With advancements in equipment and techniques over the last couple decades the ability for most departments through Rescue Companies to mitigate technical rescue incidents is at an all-time high. With all this technical advancement we have to ask ourselves have we lost touch with the simplistic approach. With budget cuts, decreased staffing levels, and increasing coverage areas we could potentially find ourselves on scene with delayed or worse yet no Rescue Company responding. This breakout lecture will take the attendee through passed down tried and true techniques that have proven time and time again to be quick options to safely mitigate rescue incidents. Basic rope operations, building stabilization techniques, and simple victim removal/movement are just some of the topics covered. Techniques will be shown and discussed that utilize basic equipment found on most Engine and Truck Company’s to efficiently mitigate rescue incidents. So if you want fill the “file cabinet” that sits under your helmet with options to mitigate the incident to the best possible outcome this class is for you.

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Ropes for the Engine Company

Robert Mitchell

In today’s Fire Service we have to do more with less. This class covers the basics of fire service rope for engine companies. These are techniques that any first due engine should be able to accomplish. Rope is the most versatile but underused tool on the fireground. The student will learn to be comfortable with the use in basic knots and anchors.

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Tailboard Size-Up

Michael Heeney

Be an asset not an anchor. This lecture will take a comprehensive look at what it takes to improve and be better every day. The focus will be on ways to challenge yourself to size up all things that are key to fireground success. I will go over key size up techniques used to make sizing up a structure easy. Knowing the little details of the task at hand will make you and your crew more successful. I will break down task level assignments from search to forcible entry allowing for forward thinking and success on the emergency scene.

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Training for Adaptability

David Rhodes

To address the changing skill levels of our work force, instructors must use different methodologies to get the desired results. Statements like, “We didn’t hire you to think!” are a left over mentality from the industrial age that no longer achieves the results needed for today’s fire service. Prior generations brought a different skill set to job and most were instinctively able to adapt a learned skill to the environment. Training today’s firefighters requires not only teaching the basic skill sets but also learning and practicing in context to not only develop the skill but to develop the decision making of the firefighter. This methodology pays big dividends for both a new generation and those who have been around. Training for Adaptability addresses these issues and introduces the attendees to experiential learning and training techniques used to produce the best training programs your members have ever experienced.

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Trapped & Dying

Issac Frazier

Do you have what it takes when seconds count? Isaac Frazier covers how the “WHY” must be more than the “WHAT”. This course looks into many aspects of the job but really takes focus on the mental process and motivation that pushes us to do marvelous things or fold under pressure. The objective is to boost performance, both skills related and task/movement efficiency, to far higher levels and then hone them in stressful environments, making you faster, more precise, and ultimately far more capable in performance when it counts. The emphasis is on training for the game of life, where the knowledge and skills learned in training will one day translate over to the streets, determining life or death.

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VES - An Aggressive Search Technique

Daniel Nelms

Whether or not it's directly utilized by your own department, most everyone is familiar with the term "Vent-Enter-Search (VES)". VES is a high risk, high stress technique with the potential for high reward if performed correctly. Over the last 3 years, the U.S. has averaged 2,333 lives lost in residential fires, comprised mostly of children or the elderly. It's time to make life safety of the resident our number 1 priority again! VES is truely a life saving tactic, that when employed by aggressive, well trained firefighters, can be used to aid in the reduction of residential fire deaths. In this class, we will discuss the "wheres" and the "whys" of VES, as well as "who" is responsible for performing VES, making proper tool selection and set-up on your rig, employing the use of ladders, isolation of the room, different search methods, and how to successfully implement this into your department. We hope to see you there, and remember... stay safe, stay low, and let it blow.

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Coordinator

Deputy Chief Tammy Snow

esnow@wichita.gov
(316) 268-4510 Office
(316) 259-9118 Cell
Wichita Fire Department
455 N Main St 11th Floor
Wichita, KS 67202

Questions

Account Clerk Colleen Shirley

Available Monday - Friday: 7:30AM - 4:30PM
cshirley@wichita.gov
(316) 268-4485 Office
Wichita Fire Department
455 N Main St 11th Floor
Wichita, KS 67202

Wichita HOT Board

  • Deputy Chief Tammy Snow
  • Battalion Chief Sid Newby
  • Captain Michael Crosby
  • Captain Keith Niemann
  • Captain Kelly Ross
  • Lieutenant Mark Misek
  • Firefighter Wade Holle
  • Firefighter Dan McElroy